Court Finds Facebook Post a Breach of Confidentiality Agreement

KEEP IT QUIET MEANS KEEP IT QUIET

We frequently advise clients to be mindful of what they post on social media, particularly when they are involved in litigation with a current or former employer. Unfortunately, Mr. Patrick Snay learned this lesson the hard way, when his daughter’s Facebook status update cost him the $80,000 settlement he obtained in an age-discrimination lawsuit.

Mr. Snay, 69, a former headmaster at Gulliver Preparatory School in Miami, sued his former employer for age discrimination when the school did not renew his contract. The parties settled the matter and entered into a settlement agreement where Gulliver agreed to pay Mr. Snay $80,000. The agreement contained a standard confidentiality clause, requiring that Snay and the school keep the terms and existence of the agreement private.

However, Snay’s daughter, Dana, a college student in Boston, couldn’t resist bragging about the case on Facebook. “Mama and Papa Snay won the case against Gulliver,” she wrote. “Gulliver is now officially paying for my vacation to Europe this summer. SUCK IT.”

Dana apparently had about 1,200 Facebook friends, many of whom are current and former Gulliver students, and news of the post made its way back to the school’s lawyers, who told the Snays they’d violated the deal. Mr. Snay won a Circuit Court ruling to enforce the deal, but a Third District Court of Appeal Judge just overturned that decision. “Snay violated the agreement by doing exactly what he had promised not to do,” the Judge wrote in her decision. “His daughter then did precisely what the confidentiality agreement was designed to prevent.”

Although Snay can appeal this decision to the Florida Supreme Court, the lesson here is quite simple: When involved in legal proceedings, don’t disclose anything on social media. It is not worth it.